MOUSE




A mouse is a pointing device that functions by detecting two-dimensional motion relative to its supporting surface. The mouse‘s motion typically translates into the motion of a cursor on a display, which allows for fine control of a graphical user interface.

To transmit their input, typical cabled mice use a thin electrical cord terminating in a standard connector, such as RS-232C, PS/2, ADB or USB. Cordless mice instead transmit data via infrared radiation (see IrDA) or radio (including Bluetooth),

1) Mechanical: This is a type of computer mouse that has a rubber or metal ball on its underside and it can roll in every direction. Sensors within the mouse, which are mechanical, detect the direction in which the ball is moving and moves the pointer on the screen in the same direction. A mouse pad should be used under the mouse to run on.

2) Optomechanical: This type is the same as the mechanical mouse except that it uses optical sensors to the motion of the ball. A mouse pad should be used under the mouse to run on.

3) Optical: This type uses a laser for detecting the mouse‘s movement. You don’t need a
mouse pad but you can use one made for optical mice. Optical mice do not have any
mechanical moving parts. This type responds more quickly and precisely than the mechanical and optomechanical mice and now that they have been around awhile the price is pretty comparable.

Different ways of operating the mouse cause specific things to happen in the GUI:

* Click: pressing and releasing a button.
o (left) Single-click: clicking the main button.
o (left) Double-click: clicking the button two times in quick succession counts as a different gesture than two separate single clicks.
o (left) Triple-click: clicking the button three times in quick succession.
o Right-click: clicking the secondary button.
o Middle-click: clicking the ternary button.
* Drag: pressing and holding a button, then moving the mouse without releasing. (Use the command “drag with the right mouse button” instead of just “drag” when you instruct a user to drag an object while holding the right mouse button down instead of the more commonly used left mouse button.)
* Button chording (a.k.a. Rocker navigation).
o Combination of right-click then left-click.
o Combination of left-click then right-click or keyboard letter.
o Combination of left or right-click and the mouse wheel.
* Clicking while holding down a modifier key.

Standard semantic gestures include:

* Rollover
* Selection
* Menu traversal
* Drag and drop
* Pointing
* Goal crossing

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