DMA (DIRECT MEMORY ACCESS)




Direct memory access (DMA) is a feature of modern computers that allows certain hardware subsystems within the computer to access system memory independently of the central processing unit (CPU).

Without DMA, when the CPU is using programmed input/output, it is typically fully occupied for the entire duration of the read or write operation, and is thus unavailable to perform other work.

With DMA, the CPU initiates the transfer, does other operations while the transfer is in progress, and receives an interrupt from the DMA controller when the operation is done. This feature is useful any time the CPU cannot keep up with the rate of data transfer, or where the CPU needs to perform useful work while waiting for a relatively slow I/O data transfer. Many hardware systems use DMA, including disk drive controllers, graphics cards, network cards and sound cards. DMA is also used for intra-chip data transfer in multi-core processors. Computers that have DMA channels can transfer data to and from devices with much less CPU overhead than computers without a DMA channel.

DMA can also be used for “memory to memory” copying or moving of data within memory. DMA can offload expensive memory operations, such as large copies or scatter-gather operations, from the CPU to a dedicated DMA engine. Intel includes such engines on high-end servers, called I/O Acceleration Technology (I/OAT).

A DMA controller can generate addresses and initiate memory read or write cycles. It contains several registers that can be written and read by the CPU. These include a memory address register, a byte count register, and one or more control registers. The control registers specify the I/O port to use, the direction of the transfer (reading from the I/O device or writing to the I/O device), the transfer unit (byte at a time or word at a time), and the number of bytes to transfer in one burst.

DMA transfers can either occur one word at a time, allowing the CPU to access memory on alternate bus cycles –

this is called cycle stealing since the DMA controller and CPU contend for memory access.

In burst mode DMA, the CPU can be put on hold while the DMA transfer occurs and a full block of possibly hundreds or thousands of words can be moved. Where memory cycles are much faster than processor cycles, an interleaved DMA cycle is possible, where the DMA controller uses memory while the CPU cannot.

In a bus mastering system, both the CPU and peripherals can be granted control of the memory bus. Where a peripheral can become bus master, it can directly write to system memory without involvement of the CPU, providing memory address and control signals as required. Some measure must be provided to put the processor into a hold condition so that bus contention does not occur.

in Burst Mode an entire block of data is transferred in one contiguous sequence. Once the DMA controller is granted access to the system bus by the CPU, it transfers all bytes of data in the data block before releasing control of the system buses back to the CPU. This mode is useful for loading program or data files into memory, but renders the CPU inactive for relatively long periods of time. The mode is also called Block Transfer Mode.

The Cycle Stealing Mode is a viable alternative for systems, in which the CPU should not be disabled for the length of time needed for burst transfer modes. In the cycle stealing mode, the DMA controller obtains access to the system bus the same way as in burst mode, using BR (Bus Request) and BG (Bus Grant) signals, which are the two signals controlling the interface between the CPU and the DMA controller. However, in cycle stealing mode, after one byte of data transfer the control of the system bus is deasserted to the CPU via BG. It is then continually requested again via BR, transferring one byte of data per request, until the entire block of data has been transferred. By continually obtaining and releasing the control of the system bus, the DMA controller essentially interleaves instruction and data transfers. The CPU processes an instruction, then the DMA controller transfers one data value, and so on. On the one hand, the data block is not transferred as quickly in cycle stealing mode as in burst mode, but on the other hand the CPU is not idled for as long as in burst mode. Cycle stealing mode is useful for controllers that monitor data in real time.

The Transparent Mode takes the most time to transfer a block of data, yet it is also the most efficient mode in terms of overall system performance. The DMA controller only transfers data when the CPU is performing operations that do not use the system buses. It is the primary advantage of the transarent mode that the CPU never stops executing its programs and the DMA transfer is free in terms of time. The disadvantage of the transparent mode that the hardware needs to determine, when the CPU is not using the system buses, which can be complex and relatively expensive.

DMA NOTES AND EXAMPLE LINK

CHANGE DMA IN XP LINK

CHANGE DMA IN WINDOWS 7 LINK

CHANGE DMA IN UBUNTU LINK

Related External Links

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